Inspired ruminations

The weight of wordsreading

Posted by Arandjel Mon, February 26, 2018 04:53:11

Language can be constricting, in particular when attempting to convey a cavalcade of visions and emotions - which is what a reading is. How we express ourselves is therefore of uttermost importance. One can never take for granted that the frame of reference is universal - quite the contrary. At my psychic circle we had this discussion the other week, on the gravity of words. This came to mind a couple of days ago, after I received an email reading from a psychic, who I accidentally came across online. I was perusing eBay for a few items, when I on a whim decided to type in "psychic reading" in the search bar. It resulted in pages and pages of psychics offering their services in bold letters along with portraits of them hunching over crystal balls and tarots cards. Curious, I clicked on a link of a psychic with ridiculously low prices but with rave reviews. Unable to resist such a bargain, I purchased a three question reading and emailed my personal information together with what I wanted to get answered. Now, I rarely get read myself, perhaps once or twice a year. Of course, I partake in psychic circles and classes, where we practice read each other all the time. However, I do not seek psychics out. My personal conviction is that readings should be a rarity. Too many times, I've encountered people addicted to readings, especially when I was working for a phone line. As with most things in life, moderation is key.

But going back to the reading, it was sent to me rather promptly. It wasn't very eloquent and was missing punctuation throughout, but the gist was quite impressive - considering the modest rate. (I actually ended up visiting this psychic's website, where I purchased a full reading for a lot more, but it was basically the same thing as the initial cheap reading - the same length, less than a page.) I'm not bringing up the spelling mistakes out of snobbery, but to illustrate a point. This person quite accurately outlined my life, without ever getting down to detail. Nevertheless, the generous use of the word "negative" was unfortunately off-putting. "Negative" was related to a trauma I experienced in my youth and which I according to them still was suffering from. Then they offered to cleanse my chakras in order to release me from this said "negativity". Unlike many other psychics with this business model, this particular one wasn't too pushy about it. The sad part is that I could relate to the trauma, and yes, it has shaped me in many ways. Plus being queer in this world tends to be traumatic. But I wouldn't necessarily label it as negative, nor do I believe that a chakra cleansing would accomplish a lot. Quite frankly, I don't believe in aura or chakra cleansing. Nor do the teachers at the Arthur Findlay College. The only one who can change your energetic field is you. Still this idea of aura cleansing persists - mainly in North America (where this psychic is from).

So the entire reading was littered with the word "negativity", which is a shame seeing how many elements of it resonated with me. It made me wonder how a person less experienced with psychics would react to it. Would it frighten them? I got this reading out of sheer inquisitiveness, but what if I, like many clients, needed genuine help. Psychics are not psychologists, but we're still professionals. As such we need to abide to a code of ethics and weigh our words carefully before sharing them with a client. A reading should be a constructive experience regardless of its content. I'd still recommend this particular psychic, but with a disclaimer to take with a grain a salt. Then again, not every psychic is for every person.

Angel meditation meditation

Posted by Arandjel Wed, February 21, 2018 05:39:33

Meditation can be a rather daunting endeavor initially, so I thought I'd do something simple for a first post of this kind, I mean, meditation is always simple, really. So find yourself a quiet and comfy spot. Sit in silence, and clear your mind of cluttering thoughts. They will keep coming at you, which is alright. The key is not to get caught up in them. In this context, they're just brain ghosts, disturbing your repose. Then envision yourself enveloped in a soft bright light. At first, this might be tricky - in particular if you're not used to visualization. Stay here for a while. Feel the light heal you. You might sense or see a presence in this light, perhaps an angel has a message for you. Listen. When you feel reinvigorated enough, let the bright light fade, and then slowly awaken your body and open up your eyes.

Don't force yourself to feel or see anything, especially if you're a complete novice. Just sitting in silence, quieting down the mind is good enough in the early stages. The rest will come naturally with time. Plus, not everybody is going to want to communicate with otherworldly beings, and that's ok.

Late night musingslife

Posted by Arandjel Tue, February 20, 2018 05:58:06

I'm definitely a night owl. Always been. I appreciate the serenity of the witching hours. It's a great time to meditate and introspect. The connection to the divine appears stronger. There is a sense of clarity. Among the things I was contemplating tonight, was what all I should include in this blog. Or rather how personal I'll allow myself to be. Writing about my experiences could possibly help somebody else, or at the very least amuse them. However there is always the risk of oversharing, which is just awkward - and a lot tacky. I also feel that I want to share my passions, maybe do an occasional book review. The problem is that I rarely if ever read spiritual literature. Does that matter? The last book I finished was Roxane Gay's "Bad Feminist", in many ways a brilliant book. Her writing has helped me deal with some recent rough patches. Following "Bad Feminist" I started reading Tobias Wolff's "In the Garden of the North American Martyrs", which is mesmerizing in it's portrayal of human characters and their fates. I appreciate well written books, and studied literature at the university for while. A degree in media and communication is what I ended up with, because I've had a passion for writing since an early age. Perhaps it's karmical. I do believe in reincarnation, but I'm not convinced we can access memories from past lives. Or maybe we all co-exist simultaneously in a multi-dimensional universe. But what can we really tell for sure about our myriad of incarnations? I'm a bit pragmatical like that, and prefer to read science over spiritual magazines. The later tend to stick to a cliche of what spirituality is, but then there's so few of them. My favorite weekly is The New Yorker. I also enjoy the Paris Review occasionally. Both are literary publications. It brings me back to where I started, so it could be a sign: for me to start sharing my writing. In the meanwhile, I'll be back with a meditation - most likely tomorrow. Eventually I'll muster enough courage to record an audio of it...

Blog image

Reading yourselfpsychic

Posted by Arandjel Fri, February 16, 2018 05:52:46

I can't believe how fast time flies: here we are rapidly heading towards the end of February. It's been almost a month since my previous past, even though it feels like it was published yesterday. What is it they say...time is just a human construct? It's certainly true when it comes to readings, where time is experienced as fluid rather than linear. Defining an exact time-frame can for that reason get a bit tricky. Even more precarious is reading for oneself. No matter how skilled the psychic, you can't escape the human factor of wishful thinking. I can just speak for myself, having ignored the visions and guidance of my spirit guides over and over again because I desperately desired another outcome. (This of course ties into the debate between fate and free will, which I'll leave for a later post.) So yes, it's quite possible to read for oneself, but keeping the ego separate from your higher good is complicated. I mean, it always is. We all bring these delusions into play in readings. How many times haven't I or any of my colleagues encountered clients who are so deadset on a certain result, that they dismissed our abilities after we've presented them with our visions and recommendations from their guides. It's all so human, and that's ok.

Pedestals feminism

Posted by Arandjel Wed, January 24, 2018 22:15:56

“People who are placed on pedestals are expected to pose, perfectly. Then they get knocked off when they fuck it up.”
― Roxane Gay, Bad Feminist: Essays

I suppose I could've just as well posted this under "life" or any other category, but I chose "feminism". Being a feminist myself, and also having "discovered" Roxane Gay recently (she's a very famous), I thought the quote captured my reaction to a video I recently saw. I was perusing YouTube the other day (which I'm addicted to), where I came across a documentary on Baba Vanga, one of the most celebrated psychics in the world. My heart dropped when she in the second part of it says that men as infallible and every woman is a "slut" (her words). Paradoxically she goes on telling a story about a male client who was a womanizer, but a good man. ?!?! To see what I'm writing about, copy and paste, with these inflammatory comments featured at the very beginning of it.

It makes me sad to see women tear each other down in this way, in particular people who purport themselves to be spiritually aware. Ironically, she was almost banned from the church she funded because the pristest considered her a witch and embarrassment. Now, I do understand that Baba Vanga, who was born in 1911 to poor farmers, lacks our current perspective on equality, but I was hoping it would've been somewhat compensated by her connection to the divine. Alas no. In the clip, you also see her working, which considering her reputation, is slightly disappointing. Well, not really, as the documentary covers her final days, so of course she wasn't at the top of her game. There is an earlier documentary, from 1976, titled ФЕНОМЕН (FENOMEN), which unfortunately is in Bulgarian and without subtitles. The full film is available at, if anybody speaks Bulgarian.

The later portrayal has left me a bit torn and sad. I don't expect people to be perfect by any means, and I know how complicated psychic work can be, but perhaps I've placed Baba Vanga on a pedestal. I've read and heard so many fantastical stories about her, that seeing her talk about women this way was a bit devastating. If she really had this view of women, I wonder how she related to her female clients. Allegedly, she accurately - albeit morosely - predicted the death of the very popular Yugoslavian artist, Silvana Armenulic. Silvana was apparently a huge believer, and was understandably quite shaken after the consultation. How much that impacted her demise is hard to say, but I (like most people, it seems) know very little of Baba Vanga's actual body of work to make some grand conclusion about her mistreating women because of internalized misogyny. Sometimes it's perhaps better to leave things alone. Pedestals are indeed a problem.

Psychic - not omniscient psychic

Posted by Arandjel Mon, January 22, 2018 05:20:11

There is a misconception about psychics that we know everything. We don't. Despite dubious advertising by some of us, portraying themselves as demigods, we are just people like anybody else. Being psychic simply means a heightened emotional awareness (I'll delve deeper into this topic in another post). The sixth sense is also something we tap in to, not a state that we're constantly in. Speaking for myself, I can be rather clueless in my regular life. Or I used to be more so back in the days. With training and experience, the psychic part has become a much more integrated part of my reality, where I easier notice energies or hear angelic advice. That doesn't translate into me being all-knowing, nor that I always listen to whatever information comes to me. I make mistakes, like most people. So the premise that psychics are pre-eminently divine is flawed, as all living beings are godly. Unfortunately, that assumption, cemented as it is in popular culture, brings about plenty of confusion and disappointment. Clients sometimes have really distorted expectations on readings and science won't take us seriously. So the meme below, which is used to make light of psychics, is rather unfunny, if people actually knew the difference between the words psychic and omniscient.

When it comes to clients, it's important to mention that not all psychics are for all people. Every client is different with their own set of needs and wants. Recommendations are therefore risky: the energies might not match, the psychic could have a bad day etc. Hopefully there's an ethical business model in place, to reimburse the client if a reading goes awry. In the capacity of being a client myself, I've had less accurate readings by famous psychics and great ones by lesser known counterparts. But then again, my personal conviction is to refrain from having too many readings: I'd say no more than a couple a year.

Blog image

More on meditation meditation

Posted by Arandjel Sun, January 21, 2018 00:25:01

Thinking through yesterday's post, I realized I probably left a few points out. My reference to the Scientific American issue on meditation wasn't to imply that science somehow has the final word for me. But science is important to me, despite it often being dogmatic and hostile towards spirituality. The other day, I had a scientist ask me to persuade them of my abilities, to which my response was that I'm not a cult. Back in the days, this kind of request would've infuriated me, but now it's just amusing. To me science and spirituality aren't antagonists, but rather holistically allies. My personal approach is to have an open but critical mind, which is a bit oxymoronic, I know.

But this isn't really what I left out. I was going to recommend a meditation journal, to document impressions - whatever they might be. It doesn't have to be written down, drawing works just as well. The are no rules for how to express yourself - grab a box of crayons and go wild! Also, leave expectations for what a meditation should be at the door. My personal experience is that every session is different. Some days 30 minutes feels like an eternity and others I do twice that. There is no need to pressure yourself through a session. Yes, it's good to be disciplined, but there are days when you're simply not in the mood - and that's important to acknowledge. With that said, I generally think five minutes is too short for a meditation, so try to do at least 10 minutes initially. If you're going rogue - not guided, don't come down on yourself if you're unable to quiet down the mind. Depending on your day, the meditation can be used to sort those thoughts out in a tranquil environment. Or pray. It's a sacred moment, so savor it.

The mystery of meditationmeditation

Posted by Arandjel Sat, January 20, 2018 06:01:22

I tend to get a lot of questions regarding meditation. People approach me, usually with the best intentions, wondering how to get started and how it will never work for them, claiming their minds being to unruly to tame. Unrealistic expectations is what is at play here, as meditation, like most things in life, is a matter of discipline and exercise. I certainly didn't start off sitting in silence for 30 mins right away, but built up to it in 5 minute increments over time. But it's easy to get the impression, since meditation is the current buzzword and touted as the cure for all ills, that it's a piece of cake. Well, it isn't, and I know a few of the foremost mediums in the world who don't like to meditate. Also one should be realistic of what meditation can achieve. The outlandish claims I sometimes read in spiritual publications are both laughable and concerning. Scientific American had a great issue out a couple of years on the documented benefits of meditation.

In addition, there is so many variations on meditations, it can be difficult to know where to start. I usually recommend guided meditations for novices. There's a plethora of them on Youtube and Spotify. Many of them are aimed towards psychic and mediumship development. If I were to recommend one for budding mediums, I'd pick this one by Linda Hopkins (even though it's long, but one can easily lay down while listening to it):